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The Hunt for Garlic Mustard for Tasty Meals!

May 1, 2013

Check these recipes out! Such a good use of something bad and abundant.

Midwestern Plants

Now is the time to hunt for garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) a biennial flowering plant in the mustard family (Brassicaceae) and remove it.

Spring rain has made the ground soft which helps with removal of garlic mustard’s tap root. This root only goes down for about an inch, then takes an abrupt turn. When you pull slowly, you can feel which way the root goes and pull accordingly. If all of it is not removed, it will grow back like a dandelion. It will also start blooming in our area soon, making it easier to find.

It is native to large areas of Europe, western and central Asia, and northwestern Africa. It was brought here by early settlers as a garden herb, but has broken free of the gardeners patch and is now considered an invasive species.

garl mustgar must

During the first year of growth, plants form rosette clumps of heart…

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